28 Comments
Apr 24, 2023Liked by Wesley Verhoeve

I'd love to see a combination of Hiroshi Sugimoto long exposures of cinema interiors with portraits from Irving Penn. I am not sure it would work with the different exposure time but it's a fictional combination anyway :D

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Apr 23, 2023Liked by Wesley Verhoeve

Those look great! Why not setup an exchange program for multiple Process readers to give it a try?

My two picks from the past:

- Robert Capa, to add some structure or patterns to his war/docu shots;

- Neil Armstrong, this is a bit of cheat, anything to make some double exposed shots with a roll of -film that was on the moon ;-)

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author

great choice and also great idea, I will think of a way to facilitate!

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Apr 23, 2023Liked by Wesley Verhoeve

Very cool results. I love the airplane. I would go with Andoni Beristan and Mous Lamrabat. I think the results would be really interesting.

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author

super interesting choice Ollie!

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Apr 23, 2023Liked by Wesley Verhoeve

Hmmm. Let's go with Ansel Adams and Vivian Maier. Nature/Urban mash up!

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author

love that!

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Apr 23, 2023Liked by Wesley Verhoeve

I would go with Ren Hang and Stephen Shore. A roll of Americana from Shore, and then Ren doing what Ren did best. It would also mean Ren was still alive; his tragic death is something I think about almost daily.

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author

wow that is a very original combo thom! would be quite something

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Apr 23, 2023·edited Apr 23, 2023Liked by Wesley Verhoeve

Lovely results! I keep wanting to experiment with darkroom double exposures. This shouldbe fun too!

As for the photography I would truly enjoy seeing Philippe Halsmanns crazy images overlayed with, for example, Sebastiao Salgado’s landscapes. contrasty people+texture seems like a promising combo :)

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author

man i love that! good idea nikita

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Oh, the double exposures turned out terrific! What a great give away idea! It would be an honor to collaborate with you.

I have done swaps like these before and loved it.

If I could do a collaboration of my choice I would probably choose Alec Soth and Elliott Erwitt. Although I would be super frightened to screw up the rolls... 🙈

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author

Soth + Erwitt is such a fun idea!

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This is not exactly answering the question, since I don't follow many photographers and only know some famous names. But if I were to pick from history, it would be the combination of a small-town kamra-e-faoree user from Afghanistan (these were little booths used to make passport photographs of ppl for important documents) and a war photographer (I doubt the American invasion was shot on film, but perhaps the Soviet one?). Of course coordinating formats would be difficult, time-travel aside (large format film would be a meeting point).

Back to 35mm though, how do you ensure the frames line up? I don't think the spacing is standardised is it? What if you shoot with a Leica M6, and me an Olympus 35RC?

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author

The way to ensure you line it up is by having the first person use a marker on the first strip of film you pull out to load it, with the marker drawing the frame. That way the second person can line that window up with their camera's frame.

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Fair point - adding a marker only works when shooting twice with the same camera?

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author

Nope. We also drew a marker on the film between two different cameras and that works just fine, both are manual winders tho.

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I would trust the marker on any Nikon from the F2 forward. Bringing the film to a marker (curtain window perhaps) would work for much of the image area in most cameras - IF the automatic take-up reel is calibrated for the same film length. This could be a problem going from manual take-up to auto-wind. But for absolute accuracy, Nikons are the only manufacturer that guaranteed it. (Even though I do not know if an F3 roll would be accurate in an F4 with the autowinder.)

But isn't that what serendipity is all about? Heh,

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For the double exposure collaboration, I would choose Ansel Adams and Cindy Sherman. I think it would be fascinating to see Adams' landscapes superimposed with Sherman's self-portraits, creating a new and surreal environment. It would also be interesting to see how their differing approaches to photography could complement or contrast with one another in the same frame.

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They look so cool! I would love to see the results of Vivian Maier and Eve Arnold in one roll

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I think it would be cool to see Andre Wagner with a street shot and Matt Day with a texture shot.

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What a great post and inspiration. I've done a project in which one photographer had to react on the previous photo and so on, but this brings it to a whole new level. Wow, I should give this a try.

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How about Saul Leiter’s rainy windows mixed with Scott Strazzante’s shooting from the hip?

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Gregory Crewdson + Bruce Gildan. Two photographers with substantially different approaches to the form, but who I would be very curious to see if their styles could align in any way. Probably won't end up being chocolate/peanut butter, but maybe cheddar cheese on apple pie? Wouldn't really think it would be good but some people love it!

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Very good! I do a lot of double exposures in-camera in different ways, however, shooting over a roll of film twice can almost be the most rewarding way to do it because of the surprises you get. Really enjoyed your images here!

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I love double exposures and there are some great ones here Wesley, including the man and the restaurant menu that you highlighted. I have found though (shooting digital) that correctly exposing both frames often doesn't achieve the best results – too much light from two perfect exposures can overexpose the final frame. It may be different shooting on film. In my experience you have to do some mental math between the two exposures to achieve a 'good exposure' on the double, so one frame being slightly too dark, the other being slightly too bright – but of course it's always a dance as per the light in each shot, and the beauty of double exposures is that anything goes, there are no rules. What's a 'perfect exposure' anyway?

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